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Thread: use of Rode VideoMic for voice overlay on video project?

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    Valued Member JoeZ's Avatar
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    Default use of Rode VideoMic for voice overlay on video project?

    Though the VideoMic is designed to plug into a video camera, is there any reason I can't plug it into my computer's mic slot to record voice overlays using the Narate Timeline feature of Movie Maker?

    Yes, I can just try to see what happens, but I always prefer to ask first- rather than experiement then find out I damaged the computer.

    Joe

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    Legend DaFireMedic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeZ View Post
    Though the VideoMic is designed to plug into a video camera, is there any reason I can't plug it into my computer's mic slot to record voice overlays using the Narate Timeline feature of Movie Maker?

    Yes, I can just try to see what happens, but I always prefer to ask first- rather than experiement then find out I damaged the computer.

    Joe

    Certainly you can, I've done it. It doesn't sound as good as some of the vocal condenser mics out there for voice overs, but it will work. It won't damage the computer.

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    Forum Mogul Lou van Wijhe's Avatar
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    To avoid picking up the PC's slight hum from vents and disks, I've recorded the commentary using my HV20. I thereafter captured the audio and added it to the timeline. Just an alternative.

    Lou
    S/W: Sony Vegas Pro 12, PC: Processor Intel i7-3770 CPU @ 3.40GHz, Camera: HF M41 PAL, WD-H43 Wide Adapter, Røde VM/SVM + Canon DM-100 mic.

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    Formerly known as Jo_the_big_O VideJo's Avatar
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    Same do I. For the same reason.

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    Senior Member orchidsofwrath's Avatar
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    Yeah the preamp in you hv20 is much better than the preamp in your computers mic in/line in. I would never ever plug anything into your computer stait without a preamp of some sort. A preamp is was gives the signal amperage (electricity). The better the preamp the "hotter" or louder the signal will be in relation to any humming or buzzing. I use a firewire interphase with high quality XLR preamps to do my recordings (i do alot more than voice overlays with that).
    As far as the video mic for voice overs, that will be fine. Mic close to the mouth and use a wind screen or pop filter. (the air from your voice at that distance will move the diaphram of the mic and make ugly thunder noise and plosive noises.) Also to avoid plosives you can point the mic at your throat instead of mouth.

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    And I use a Rode VideoMic with my Sony PCM-D50, and then transfer the files to the 'puter via USB:

    http://pro.sony.com/bbsc/ssr/cat-aud...t-pcmd50.shtml

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    Moderator Erik Bien's Avatar
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    Something like this may help combat ambient noise as well as the reflections SGs pick up from hard surfaces when used indoors.

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    Valued Member JoeZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lou van Wijhe View Post
    To avoid picking up the PC's slight hum from vents and disks, I've recorded the commentary using my HV20. I thereafter captured the audio and added it to the timeline. Just an alternative.

    Lou
    Lou, I don't understand- so, when you're recording the commentary to your HV-20- just keep a cap over the lens? So you then have a blank video with voice- which you then capture and cut and add the pieces to the proper clip?

    What I liked about capturing voice with MS Windows Movie Maker and my Rode VideoMic plugged into my sound card is that the software will drop that "sound bite" directly into the time line- then I can test it quickly to see if it needs improvement, which it usually does- if I don't like it, I delete it and try again.

    Since the Rode has some battery power- this works OK, but not great. That item mentioned below, the Sony PCM-D50, by Doctor Benway- looks like a great tool, but it also looks expensive. I didn't see a price on the web site he referenced.

    I don't understand preamp technology- is there a not too expensive preamp which would work well with the Rode and give a semi-profesional sound?

    Joe

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    Formerly known as Jo_the_big_O VideJo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeZ View Post
    Lou, I don't understand- so, when you're recording the commentary to your HV-20- just keep a cap over the lens? So you then have a blank video with voice- which you then capture and cut and add the pieces to the proper clip?
    Separate mono mic, connected to extra mic connection of the HV20. This to eliminate the hum of the on-board mic. Also, do not connect the HV20 to the wall plug, but work with a battery. The wall plug connection may also have a hum . . .
    Lens needs not to be covered. Shoot at the wall. After capturing the footage, you separate audio from video en thereafter delete the video part. Then move the voice over to the right place in the timeline.

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    RODE also makes a 10' extension cable for about $20, part number VC1, that would put a lot of distance between you and your comp if you were sold on recording it that way.

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    Valued Member JoeZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by randomhero View Post
    RODE also makes a 10' extension cable for about $20, part number VC1, that would put a lot of distance between you and your comp if you were sold on recording it that way.
    Cool! I had no idea- the cord that comes with the Rode is very short indeed. I will order that right away!

    Thanks, randomhero!

    This web forum has been incredibly valuable to my learning video.

    Joe

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    I have done a few voice overs by connecting the mic to the camera and then connecting the camera to my laptop through firewire. From there I open up HDVsplit and record what I need. Once I import that file into my editing program I just delete the video track. I know it may sound a little crazy but it saves my tapes and is faster than just recording to tape then transferring it to the computer.

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    Senior Member geekd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canon user 991 View Post
    I have done a few voice overs by connecting the mic to the camera and then connecting the camera to my laptop through firewire. From there I open up HDVsplit and record what I need. Once I import that file into my editing program I just delete the video track. I know it may sound a little crazy but it saves my tapes and is faster than just recording to tape then transferring it to the computer.
    This sounds like the winning answer!

    I have several different computer audio interfaces, but if I didn't have one, this is what I'd do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeZ View Post
    Cool! I had no idea- the cord that comes with the Rode is very short indeed. I will order that right away!

    Thanks, randomhero!

    This web forum has been incredibly valuable to my learning video.

    Joe
    No problem. Ideally, you'd want to upgrade to a desk stand with a shockmount and a higher end microphone for voiceover work, but if this is what you have available then it's a working solution.

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