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Thread: Which camcorder to buy?

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    Default Which camcorder to buy?

    Hey guys i am new here, i am doing research on which camcorder to buy. i am looking for few things in them. first i will be shotting music videos and fashion related type videos. i want something that has internal memory, i am not to big on tapes. i will be adding dof adapter, external mic, etc. so i need something that can take the weight. lastly my budget is around $1000 maybe little bit more. i don't care if the camera is new model or old as long as its good. Thanks

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    FilmMaker Extraordinaire Daniel Rutter's Avatar
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    If you're wanting DOF... then you're best looking into DSLRs. They don't rob light from the camera. You can mix, say, the Canon T2i (which is the cheaper capable DSLR) with an external recording device such as the Zoom H1.

    Also, you're not saying if your $1000 is in US, AU or CAD.

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    Sorry the its $1000 USD

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    FilmMaker Extraordinaire Daniel Rutter's Avatar
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    Well, you could go with a refurbed T2i from canon, and still have enough for the Zoom H1 recorder, and some memory cards. I'd say, once you get a little more money... look into adding a mic, and maybe some lenses.

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    Tropical Legend cgbier's Avatar
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    Uhm, DOF is built in in any camera you buy.
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    Legend HueyNRolf's Avatar
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    If you're doing music video, the onboard camera sound is all you need. It's only use is for syncing in post, once that's done you can dump it. So it doesn't matter how it sounds.

    If you're doing a live performance, that's a different matter. Ideal set up is to record the sound off the mixer. In both cases a microphone is redundant.
    Update please, BooF?

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    hmm this is very interesting, until know i was doing research on camcorder like Canon HG10, HG20 and Sony HDR models. I never thought DSLR camera to use as video recording. Ok i will look in to Canon 2Ti. Any other suggestion? Thanks

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    Legend Janke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cgbier View Post
    Uhm, DOF is built in in any camera you buy.
    DOF has come to mean "shallow depth of field" on this forum... and to get that you need a camera with a larger sensor, like a T2i.

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    Forum Mogul Fade to inferno's Avatar
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    I would recommend canon t2i, canon hv40, or a canon 60D.
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    Legend Bif's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janke View Post
    DOF has come to mean "shallow depth of field" on this forum... and to get that you need a camera with a larger sensor, like a T2i.
    I differ (I don't even "beg" to differ, I just do. And strongly)!

    The term DOF is "mindlessly" tossed around by those who care little about learning even the most basic photography (and video is based on photography and all that goes with it) and have looked only at the "selective focus" aspect of shallow "Depth Of Field", preferring to remain "blissful" in ignorance.

    They haven't had to learn any basic photography because most consumer camcorders are primarily used in a "point 'n shoot" mode. I can't count the number of times I've seen the declaration in these forums, "But I don't want to learn photography, I just want to shoot 'great video' (or 'pro looking video')".

    DOF is the acronym for "Depth Of Field", whether shallow, deep, or inbetween. A further definition of "Depth Of Field" is "zone of acceptable sharpness". cgbier's statement "DOF is built in in any camera you buy" means that any aperture setting will have it's own "depth of field" or "zone of acceptable sharpness".

    Now you and I know this, and many others here know it, but the ones who don't need to understand what they want is not DOF but selective focus. Then they won't appear ignorant by "mindlessly" tossing around a term they obviously do not understand.

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    Legend Janke's Avatar
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    Whether you like it or not, I stand by my "has come to mean" - it is a fact that the term DOF is used wrongly by both n00bs and by experienced users too; like this: "I'm going to get a DOF for my HV camera"...

    But, we'll do what we can to educate "them"...

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    FilmMaker Extraordinaire Daniel Rutter's Avatar
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    Agreed Bruce... I guess when I recommended the t2i, for "DOF". I should have said "better control of the DOF".

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    Tropical Legend cgbier's Avatar
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    With a little bit help from a friend, you can also achieve some reasonable shallow depth of field with an HV40. Paper thin though....
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    Guess canon are the only ones allowed,HV cams but tape are brilliant,T2i are capable of great footage But panas GH2 can take great footage as easily as a camcorder with the advantages the same as DSLRs although it is not one strictly,

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    Hey i want to thanks everyone who helped me out. I have decide to go with Canon T2i, but i went today to best buy to check one out. I found the manual zoom and zoom out to be bit rough on the actual lens, it that just that lens? or all the canon lens are like that? on the other hand Nikon lens was really smooth. Thanks also if i buy refurb from canon it only has 90 day warranty, its that worth the risk?

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    La jeune Québécoise charlie_tango's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janke View Post
    DOF has come to mean "shallow depth of field" on this forum...
    So, DOF means only the part that is in focus? and not as many people tend to say by "having a blurred background and a talent in focus" ? ­That means "shallow DOF" only?
    Am i getting it right?
    Quote Originally Posted by Janke View Post
    it is a fact that the term DOF is used wrongly by both n00bs and by experienced users too
    Like who? I'm just curious.

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    Legend Janke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeewho View Post
    manual zoom and zoom out to be bit rough
    The DSLR lenses aren't meant to be zoomed during a shot, so it really doesn't matter. Besides, you'd need a constant f-stop lens (expensive) for zooming while shooting, anyway. If you're fond of "pumping the zoom", you need a camcorder, not a DSLR...


    Quote Originally Posted by charlie_tango View Post
    So, DOF means only the part that is in focus?
    DOF can mean that everything is in focus, too. DOF can be shallow, or it can be "deep", and anything inbetween.

    For all n00bs, and some experienced users, too, I suggest reading this (but you can skip the math ) : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depth_of_field
    Last edited by Janke; 2011 January 28th at 02:23.

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    ...formerly known as 'drapeama' Marc-Alexandre Drapeau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janke View Post
    For all n00bs, and some experienced users, too, I suggest reading this (but you can skip the math ) : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depth_of_field
    Why do i feel like, concerned, by "some experienced users"?
    I DO IT BECAUSE I CAN. I CAN BECAUSE I WANT TO. I WANT TO BECAUSE YOU SAID I COULDN'T.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zeewho View Post
    I found the manual zoom and zoom out to be bit rough on the actual lens, it that just that lens?
    The kit lens will seem 'rough' - models differ and primes (new and vintage) and many L series lenses will feel very different to a kit lens focusing and zooming via shoddy plastic cams.

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    Legend Janke's Avatar
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    Even an L lens may be unsuitable for video - only those with a fixed f-stop will allow you to zoom while shooting, others will give you step-wise changing exposure.

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    Senior Member jotkeycom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janke View Post
    The DSLR lenses aren't meant to be zoomed during a shot, so it really doesn't matter. Besides, you'd need a constant f-stop lens (expensive) for zooming while shooting, anyway. If you're fond of "pumping the zoom", you need a camcorder, not a DSLR...

    DOF can mean that everything is in focus, too. DOF can be shallow, or it can be "deep", and anything inbetween.

    For all n00bs, and some experienced users, too, I suggest reading this (but you can skip the math ) : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depth_of_field
    You can most definitely zoom in and out with the kit lenses so idk what you're talking about... It works perfectly fine.

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    Senior Member jotkeycom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janke View Post
    Even an L lens may be unsuitable for video - only those with a fixed f-stop will allow you to zoom while shooting, others will give you step-wise changing exposure.
    How is it unsuitable?

    If you're saying that because you don't like the picture getting brighter or darker during the shot, that doesn't make it unsuitable... You just limit it or correct in post or just not care that much since it's not that big of a deal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jotkeycom View Post
    How is it unsuitable?
    Correction in post - ok! But if you value your time you want a 'constant aperture' zoom - the pricey ones.

    E.g. http://www.canon.co.uk/For_Home/Prod...55_f28_IS_USM/

    http://dojoklo.wordpress.com/2010/07...erture-lenses/

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    Legend Bif's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by charlie_tango View Post
    So, DOF means only the part that is in focus? and not as many people tend to say by "having a blurred background and a talent in focus" ? ­That means "shallow DOF" only?
    Am i getting it right?
    Well, kind of.

    DOF is the acronym for the term "depth of field", which term refers to the "zone of acceptable sharpness".

    Not all within that zone is "in focus", the specific point one has focused on is in focus with some area in front of the point of focus and some area behind appearing sharp to some degree. The closer to the plane focused on the sharper it looks, when it no longer appears sharp enough then that point is outside the zone.

    Generally the wider the lens aperture the shallower the "zone of acceptable sharpness" will be, the narrower the aperture the deeper this zone will be. And lens focal length and field of view will also affect depth of field. A wider angle lens will appear to render wider areas as sharp while telephoto lenses will tend to exhibit shallower depth of field making focus more critical.

    Distance from the lens to the subject also affects depth of field in that the zone of acceptable sharpness seems to get even narrower close up.

    And in most cases approximately one third of the zone extends in front of the plane of focus with about two thirds of the zone extending behind that plane.

    This is probably more than you really wanted to know about depth of field. To really answer your question...Having a blurred background and a talent in focus does tend to be "shallow DOF" only but the better term to describe that would be "selective focus" which is achieved by using a lens, aperture, and shooting distance that results in "shallow depth of field".

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    Senior Member jotkeycom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Benway View Post
    Correction in post - ok! But if you value your time you want a 'constant aperture' zoom - the pricey ones.

    E.g. http://www.canon.co.uk/For_Home/Prod...55_f28_IS_USM/

    http://dojoklo.wordpress.com/2010/07...erture-lenses/
    I think by making the point that the zooming during the shot HAS to stay at the same brightness is absolutely ridiculous. It's a matter of preference/opinion -- brightness changing a little bit does not automatically make footage unusable. Not to mention it's not that time consuming to fix it in post.

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